60 Years after His Death, Buddy Holly To Perform ‘Live’ Again in Touring Hologram

sheet music 700

One of only two live filmed performances of Buddy Holly that live on

prior to the Hologram

 

BUDDY HOLLY TO PERFORM  AGAIN

Courtresy Natalie Groves, KVUE:

BEVERLY HILLS, CA — It’s a sign of the times. A Buddy Holly hologram is in the works.

Hologram USA Entertainment Inc., the same people who brought the Tupac hologram to Coachella, announced its partnership with Holly’s widow to bring a tour of the late star to Texas in 2016. Maria Elena Holly gave Hologram USA permission to use Holly’s likeness for the hologram.

“I am so excited that my partnership with Hologram USA on the Buddy Holly concert project will allow a new generation of fans to experience the thrill of seeing Buddy ‘live’ and in concert for the first time in many decades,” said Maria Elena Holly, head of Buddy Holly Licensing. “This show is dedicated to Buddy’s fans around the world — it is because of them that his music will ‘Not Fade Away.'”

Maria Elena Holly attends Buddy Holly's induction into
Maria Elena Holly attends Buddy Holly’s induction into The Hollywood Walk of Fame on September 7, 2011 in Hollywood, California. (Photo: Jason LaVeris, FilmMagic)
Buddy Holly, a Lubbock native, is widely considered a pioneer of rock ‘n’ roll music. His career only lasted a year before his untimely death by a plane crash on Feb. 3, 1959. Holly was 22 years old. The day of the plane crash is often referred to as ‘The Day the Music Died.’

The Holly hologram is already in the works. The launch city and date will be announced soon. After the Texas Holly tour, the show will tour the United States, and then the world.

“I am a big Buddy Holly fan so much so that I still can’t believe that we are in the Buddy Holly business. This is a great time for Hologram USA to help bring back this incredible icon,” said Alki David, CEO of Hologram USA.

 

56 Years after His Death, Buddy Holly To Perform ‘Live’…

Colorized ‘I Love Lucy’ Theater Tribute Posts Huge Grosses on Lucille Ball’s Birthday – New CD Release

Producers discuss the making of special I LOVE LUCY Colorized Celebration with clips

The special, one-day screenings beat ‘Aladdin’ to come in No. 6.

Moviegoers showed their love for Lucille Ball in a big way on Tuesday.

I Love Lucy: A Colorized Celebration grossed $777,645 from 660 theaters across the country, enough to beat out Aladdin and come in No. 6 at the domestic box office.

The tribute, timed to what would have been Ball’s 108th birthday, is a collection of five classic episodes of the inimitable TV show, along with a new featurette about the colorization process.

The one-day screening was a presentation of Fathom Events and CBS Home Entertainment. The theater special was timed with a NEW CD RELEASE :

I Love Lucy: Colorized Collection

i love lucy colorized cd
New I LOVE LUCY Colorized Collection
NOW On Sale HERE

“The incredible performance of I Love Lucy: A Colorized Celebration demonstrates the enormous appeal of experiencing classic television on the big screen, and Fathom Events’ commitment to innovation and creativity in both the broadcast and cinema industries,” said Fathom Events CEO Ray Nutt, whose company is enjoying a record-breaking year. cont

Famous featured ‘Vegemite’ commercial

Lucille Ball’s Daughter Reflects on ‘I Love Lucy’ Memories, Finding Own Place in Creative Arts

Ahead of the event, The Hollywood Reporter spoke with entertainer Lucie Arnaz — the daughter of Ball and Arnaz, who made her debut on Here’s Lucy in 1968 and subsequently carved out a varied performance career in musical theater and acting — about childhood memories, her experience of I Love Lucy and finding her own place in the creative arts. 

You’ve been a performer in your own right for many years now. How do you feel about connections to your mother and father now versus when you were growing up?

In a weird way, I guess I’ve always expected it, but truthfully, I don’t get a lot of them. I don’t know why that is. The only people who tend to connect me with them in that way are people on Facebook. I’ll say something or I’ll do something, and they’ll say, “Oh, just like your mom on such and such show….” But generally, in my professional career, very few times have I had to go head-to-head, and I think it’s because I went in a different direction. I wasn’t on a television show doing comedy sitcoms for most of my life; I went into theater and music. Maybe that’s why I decided to switch it up a little bit.

Was there an expectation that you would enter the arts field?

When I was very young, like five or six, I was shy and afraid to get up in front of people. I think it was because I saw the power of what the two of them were, and it was intimidating when you don’t know if you have any talent. I don’t want to be that opening act, you know? But when I became about eight or nine years old, I had a little backyard group with my girlfriends and we would put on plays that we either made up or we would lip-sync to Broadway show albums and things. It was something I was passionate about, I would jump up on make-believe stages. Mom was very supportive of any of my brothers’ and my passions; whatever it was, if he wanted to play the drums or piano then she would arrange lessons. She saw that I was having a good time doing that so she built a little stage in the backyard garage, with one light, so that we could do it better, and we would charge tickets to our neighbors.

Then, I picked a high school because it had one of the best drama departments, and I started doing shows and learning craft that way. When [Lucille] got ready to switch her television show up, she just popped the question. She said, “You know, we’ve done our show for six years, and syndication wise we could start another show and syndicate it, and I’m just thinking that perhaps you would like to play the child on the new series.” I thought that was interesting, because she was giving me the opportunity if I wanted it, to continue the education in the direction I was going. At first I didn’t want to do it, but then I thought, as long as I don’t make a fool of myself, it’s probably great education. And it truly, truly was. But I don’t think either my mother or my father assumed I would go into this business at all and they never pushed us in that direction or told us it was a great thing to do. What we saw were two people who worked hard but were hardly ever home. We knew from the inside how hard this business could be. I had no fantasies about what working in show business would be, so it was my choice to go ahead and give it a shot.

How did your experience of your mother differ from how the public consumed her on television?

My mother was a very private person and so was my father, though he was more gregarious with people. He was Latin, everybody was “amigo'”and a best friend. He would sing at the drop of a hat even when he wasn’t being paid for it. My mother, when she was off-camera and home, she was home. She didn’t leap at the chance to get up and perform in front of people, like a lot of comedians and performers do. She liked her at-home time with family, she played games sort of as meditation and relaxation, Backgammon and Scrabble.

You were well into your performance career when Lucille died. Is there a memory you can recall where the two of you connected as peers and shared your experience?

It’s interesting because I started my professional career on the Here’s Lucy show. It was interesting to sort of be peers from the beginning, even though she was the star of the show, we were all actors trying to learn our lines and get the blocking right in four days and to perform in front of an audience. There’s a camaraderie there and we did feel like peers, especially after the first couple of years with Gail [Gordon] and some of the guest stars that would come on. Then, later on, she was very supportive of my work when she would come and see me in a Broadway show or touring around the country. I don’t think I ever got a note from her ever. I always felt like she was another actor friend, but one who really wasn’t a musical performer and she was sort of in awe that I decided to go and do that. She would say, “I don’t know how you do it,” and that was a huge compliment coming from her.

There are many family values in I Love Lucy that have resulted in its timeless appeal. What do you most identify with from the show, that you’ve integrated into your own life?

Since I grew up with it and never knew anything else, I don’t know if I resonate with it the way other people do although I laugh at it for the same reasons: ordinary people getting into ordinary situations and trying to get out of them, while getting into trouble and somehow getting away with it and everybody still loves them in the end. If there’s anything I take away from the show in general, I think it’s the unconditional love. That’s the feeling [you get] when the show is over: Awww. It worked out OK, and that I can get in trouble too and maybe there’s somebody who will put their arms around me at the end of the day and say, “I still love you.” I incorporate that into my life and I hope that’s the way I live my life. Also, to not take things very seriously. When you grow up as the daughter of Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz, you learn to see the humor in things. That’s important today.

What is your take on the newly colorized episodes?

I didn’t get as excited about it as everybody else, and I think there could be something in my brain that remembers what it looked like for real and so black-and-white or color doesn’t affect me really. I still appreciate black-and-white, and I kind of didn’t like the intrusion in the color, it took me out of it, but I’ve changed my mind a little bit because it seems to be attracting so much of the younger crowd who don’t like black-and-white. If that’s true, then that’s great. I do think it’s hilarious that Lucille has become ultra-famous on that show for being a redhead in a black-and-white show. It just proves that you didn’t need it to be color. But hey, it’s like a party — they spent an awful lot of money to do this well, and they did it really well. It’s more the idea, too, that they’re running it on the big screen. The fact that they’re having this event to celebrate mom’s birthday on Aug. 6 and they would put it all around the country — is fantastic.

How has your performance career been influenced by Lucille’s acting style?

I hope what I have taken from watching her for 68 years is the believability. If you don’t believe what you’re doing, nobody will believe it and it won’t be funny. People can write lots of funny stuff for you, but if you play it like you know how funny it is, it’s never funny. She believed what she did and she was the queen of doing that. There isn’t a fake moment in I Love Lucy. Not one. If you look at an example, maybe the Vitameatavegamin routine, there isn’t a false moment — she is in it from the beginning all the way through to the end. And it can be as exaggerated as she wanted it to be because she was totally connected to what she was doing and why. Not trying to get a laugh, trying to be in the situation. It’s a perfect example because she kept taking another tablespoon of the stuff, so it shows how the increments of this could get bigger and bigger and you actually watch it happen. She never got ahead of it — it’s kind of a wonderful metaphor for life: Be living in that first spoonful and then be living in the second spoonful and don’t be ahead of yourself. That’s what you learn from watching her.

Oldies Trivia Test – Some of these are Tough

eight days a week birthdays, deaths, etc

 

 

jukebox

PRESENTS …

Have Fun With This Oldies Trivia Test ….

SOME OF THESE ARE TOUGH

1. When did ”Little Suzie” finally wake up?
(a) The movie’s over, it’s 2 o’clock
(b) The movie’s over, it’s 3 o’clock
(c) The movie’s over, it’s 4 o’clock
2. ”Rock Around The Clock” was used in what movie?
(a) Rebel Without A Cause
(b) Blackboard Jungle
(c) The Wild Ones
3. What’s missing from a Rock & Roll standpoint?
Earth _____
(a) Angel
(b) Mother
(c) Worm
4. ”I found my thrill…” where?
(a) Kansas City
(b) Heartbreak Hotel
(c) Blueberry Hill
5. ”Please turn on your magic beam
_____ _____ bring me a dream,”
(a) Mr. Sandman
(b) Earth Angel
(c) Dream Lover
6. For which label did Elvis Presley first record?
(a) Atlantic
(b) RCA
(c) Sun
7. He asked, ”Why’s everybody always pickin’ on me?” Who was he?
(a) Bad, Bad Leroy Brown
(b) Charlie Brown
(c) Buster Brown
8. In Bobby Darin’s ”Mack The Knife,” the one with the knife, was named:
(a) Mac Heath
(b) Mac Cloud
(c) McNamara
9. Name the song with
”A-wop bop a-loo bop a-lop bam boom.”
(a) Good Golly, Miss Molly
(b) Be-Bop-A-Lula
(c) Tutti Fruitti

DEL SHANNON
Can you name these two friends?


10. 
Who is generally given credit for originating the term ”Rock And Roll”?
(a) Dick Clark
(b) Wolfman Jack
(c) Alan Freed
11. In 1957, he left the music business to become a preacher:
(a) Little Richard
(b) Frankie Lymon
(c) Tony Orlando

12. 
Paul Anka’s ”Puppy Love” is written to what star?
(a) Brenda Lee
(b) Connie Francis
(c) Annette Funicello

13. 
The Everly Brothers were…..
(a) Pete and Dick
(b) Don and Phil
(c) Bob and Bill

14. 
The Big Bopper’s real name was:
(a) Jiles P. Richardson
(b) Roy Harold Scherer Jr.
(c) Marion Michael Morrison

15. 
In 1959, Berry Gordy, Jr., started a small record company called…
(a) Decca
(b) Cameo
(c) Motown

16. 
Edd Brynes had a hit with ”Kookie, Kookie, Lend Me Your Comb”. What TV show was he on?
(a) 77 Sunset Strip
(b) Hawaiian Eye
(c) Surfside Six

17. 
In 1960 Bobby Darin married:
(a) Carol Lynley
(b) Sandra Dee
(c) Natalie Wood

18. 
They were a one hit wonder with ”Book Of Love”
(a) The Penguins
(b) The Monotones
(c) The Moonglows

Famous cameo role by who and on what show?


19. 
The Everly Brothers sang a song called
”Till I ______ You.”
(a) Loved
(b) Kissed
(c) Screwed
(d) Met

20. 
Chuck Berry sang
”Oh, ___________, why can’t you be true?”
(a) Suzie Q
(b) Peggy Sue
(c) Maybelline

21. 
”Wooly _______”
(a) Mammouth
(b) Bully
(c) Pully

22. 
”I’m like a one-eyed cat…..”
(a) can’t go into town no more
(b) sleepin’ on a cold hard floor
(c) peepin’ in a seafood store

23. 
”Sometimes I wonder what I’m gonna do……..”
(a) cause there ain’t no answer for a life without booze
(b) cause there ain’t no cure for the summertime blues
(c) cause my car’s gassed up and I’m ready to cruise

24. 
”They often call me Speedo, but my real name is……”
(a) Mr. Earl
(b) Jackie Pearl
(c) Milton Berle

25. 
”Be Bop A Lula ….”
(a) she’s got the rabies
(b) she’s my baby.
(c) she loves me, maybe

26. 
”Fine Love, Fine Kissing …..”
(a) right here
(b) fifty cents
(c) just for you

27. 
”He wore black denim trousers and …..”
(a) a pink carnation
(b) pink leotards
(c) motorcycle boots
28. ”I got a gal named………”
(a) Jenny Zamboni
(b) Gerri Mahoney
(c) Boney Maroney

W
where did Beatles final concert take place with these accompanying acts: Extra points for knowing the year , exact date even better?

Answers:
                                                                        

Scroll Down so you aren’t tempted to cheat (as if cheating were needed here).

* * * * * * * * * * * *
1. (c) The movie’s over, it’s 4 o’clock
2. (b) Blackboard Jungle
3. (a) Angel
4. (c) Blueberry Hill
5. (a) Mr. Sandman
6. (c) Sun
7. (b) Charlie Brown
8. (a) Mac Heath
9. (c) Tutti Fruitti
10. (c) Alan Freed
11. (a) Little Richard
12. (c) Annette Funicello
13. (b) Don and Phil
14. (a) Jiles P. Richardson
15. (c) Motown
16. (a) 77 Sunset Strip
17. (b) Sandra Dee
18. (b) The Monotones
19. (b) Kissed
20. (c) Maybelline
21. (b) Bully
22. (c) peepin’ in a sea food store
23. (b) cause there ain’t no cure for the summertime blues
24. (a) Mr. Earl
25. (b) she’s my baby
26. (a) right here
27. (c) motorcycle boots
28. (c) Boney Maroney
Send this to everyone lucky enough to be teenagers in the Doo Wop era…… or who wishes they had been.

Wild-Man Marty Allen Kept Them Laughing for Half Century – Passes at 95

 

Marty Allen, the baby-faced, bug-eyed comedian with wild black hair who was a staple of TV variety shows, game shows and talk shows for decades, died Monday night. He was 95.

Allen died in Las Vegas of complications from pneumonia with his wife and performing partner of the last three decades Karon Kate Blackwell by his side, Allen’s spokeswoman Candi Cazau told The Associated press.

Allen, known for his greeting and catchphrase “hello dere,” was a living link late in life to a generation of long-dead superstars with whom he shared a stage, including Dean Martin, Frank Sinatra, Lena Horne and Elvis Presley

He first found fame as half of the duo Allen & Rossi with partner Steve Rossi, who died in 2014. Allen & Rossi appeared 44 times on “The Ed Sullivan Show,” including the episodes where the Beatles performed and most of America watched.

“Everyone remembers those shows with The Beatles, and they were great, but we appeared on all the shows,” Allen said in 2014. “There wasn’t a talk show on TV that didn’t want Allen & Rossi.”

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JIMMY BEAUMONT, lead singer of the Skyliners, was Rock and Roll King in Hometown Pittsburg

Jimmy Beaumont

JIMMY BEAUMONT, lead singer of the Skyliners

died Saturday (October 7), a couple of weeks shy of his 77th birthday. Jimmy originally started singing while at Knoxville Junior High School in Pittsburgh in a group called the Montereys (later the Crescents) that came to the attention of local manager Joe Rock. He got them a contract with Calico Records with a song he wrote (literally on the way to the recording studio) called “Since I Don’t Have You”. Released under the name “the Skyliners”, it got to #12 in 1959 and was followed by (among others) “This I Swear” (#26-1959) and “Pennies From Heaven” (#24-1960). As a solo artist, Jimmy barely scratched the national chart with “Ev’rybody’s Cryin'” (#100-1961) and ” I Feel Like I’m Falling In Love” (#123-1965). The Skyliners, however, called it quits by 1964. Jimmy took on a variety of non-musical jobs, including driving a cab, before re-forming the Skyliners to play the oldies circuit starting in the ’70s and he continued to front the group until his passing. The Skyliners were inducted into the Vocal Group Hall of Fame in 2002. Scroll down Facebook to Oct 10, 2017  for more video clips or http://OldiesCountry.com (search Skyliners)


One of the the Skyliners later efforts after the group reforned in 1974 when ‘oldies’ were first becoming popular